About
George Washington Carver Alumni Association

Preserving the Place You Cherish

George Washington Carver Alumni Association (GWCAA) consists of past graduates and the George Washington Carver Regional High School alumni. It is a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1968 and was chartered in 1972. The organization is currently registered in Washington, DC, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

What GWCAA Do

  • Act as a unifying association and keeping the GWC memory at the forefront
  • Supporting youth seeking a higher education
  • Overseeing, all chapters established under the authority and sanction of GWCAA
  • Solicit financial support and other resources from Alumni friends, or government, grants, foundation, and corporate sectors
  • Maintain a wholesome relationship with the CORM Counties when proposing or implementing alumni programs
  • Organize and mobilize the strength of the Alumni for the benefit of African American education
  • Encourage a spirit of love, loyalty, and pride for our Alma Mater
  • Maintain a friendly, working relationship among the Alumni
  • Promote professional growth while rewarding and honoring outstanding service contributions to GWCAA
  • GWCAA Logo is the same as the Mascot (The Hawk)
  • Inviting members to attend the annual meetings. A resident agent should be a member of the association
George Washington Carver Alumni Association

Our History

Before 1948, young American-African students experienced extreme difficulty obtaining high school education in Culpeper, Greene, Madison, Orange, and Rappahannock.

Culpeper and Orange counties had a secondary program. Still, the offerings were very limited, that some parents paid for their children's school enrollment elsewhere to guarantee their school admission. No educational program was offered for Greene, Madison, and Rappahannock counties beyond the 7th grade. The children of these counties were forced to gain a high school education elsewhere at their parents' total expense.

School Proposal for African-American Children

In 1946, the struggles between African-American citizens of all five counties and the threat of legal action led to a regional secondary school being explored for the governing bodies. Greene County then withdrew from Albemarle County and voted to merge.

The other four counties agreed that a regional high school meets the criteria and gives the counties substantial economic benefits. In 1946 it was listed in the deed information above the representative of Orange County proposed to the regional group (Culpeper, Madison, and Rappahannock). It is stated a resolution to request the approval and allocation of funds from the Governor of Virginia (Gov. William C. Tuck) to build a regional high school for these counties' African-American children.

George Washington Carver Alumni Association

The Resolution

Madison and Rappahannock counties have no high school facilities for Afro-Americans. Orange County has one four-room high school for Afro-Americans, housing at present 125 Afro-Americans, and the high school facilities for Afro-Americans at Culpeper are inadequate.

Funds Allocation

The Regional Board of Control said high school, assembled at Culpeper, Virginia on October 11, 1946, urged the Honorable William M. Tuck, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, to approve the allocation of $75,000.00 to this project. They wanted to proceed with their plans to erect the high school building for Afro-Americans of the four counties earliest.

George Washington Carver Regional High School

George Washington Carver Regional High School, named for one of America’s greatest scientists, an African-American who revolutionized agriculture and economically saved agriculture in the South. The school opened its doors Friday, October 1, 1948, to 452 students.

1949 Yearbook 20 Teachers List

  • Mr. Frederick. W. Black
  • Mrs. Viola Price Blair
  • Mrs. Carrie Michie
  • Mr. R.B. Hooper
  • Mrs. E.C. Washington
  • Mr. Frizzell E. Jones
  • Mrs. Alease Scott
  • Miss. F.A. Young
  • Mr. H.T. Perry
  • Mrs. Marion Anglin
  • Mr. Frederick I. Hawkins
  • Jeanette C. Moore
  • Mrs. Kate H. Johnson
  • Mr. Overton Rexford Johnson
  • Mr. Robert L. Barnes
  • Mrs. Eva W. Jackson
  • Mr. David A. Richardson
  • Mr. C.L. Conyers
  • Mrs. Stella H. Fleshmon
  • Mr. Ananias C. Washington
George Washington Carver Alumni Association

Others

  • The Only Principal, Mr. Harvey Fleshmon
  • Secretary, Miss Virginia Carter
  • Cafeteria manager, the only Custodian, Mr. William Lewis, and many volunteer parent workers

Physical Plant Expanded

With the dramatic enrollment growth, the school’s physical facility was extended soon after its opening with the addition of eight classrooms and a gym. The New Farmer of America Chapter was named after The first Agriculture teacher, Mr. Overton Rexford Johnson. Mr. Robert L. Barnes wrote the Alma Mater. The next year they got a physical education teacher, Mr. Wilbert L. Lovett, and a band director, Mr. Elmer F. Sampson.

George Washington Carver Alumni Association

State & National Level Recognition

George Washington Carver Regional High School quickly gained recognition on the state and national level. Its highly motivated and dedicated students distinguished themselves in high school activities, colleges, universities, citizens, and workplaces.

Two Decades of Service

In 1967, George Washington Carver Regional High School closed its doors as a high school with 19 years of service. From the yearbooks, over 4,500 young students had grace in its classrooms, and under 1,500 graduated.

  • 1949-62
  • 1950-51
  • 1951-80
  • 1952-89
  • 1953-84
  • 1954-88
  • 1955-18, The last 11th grade
  • 1956-56, The 1st 12th-grade graduation
  • 1957-81
  • 1958-96, the largest graduating class
  • 1959-94
  • 1960-83
  • 1961-69
  • 1962-73
  • 1963-83
  • 1964-68
  • 1965-90
  • 1966-79
  • 1967-79
  • 1968-11 did not go with the integrations

During the 19 years, these young students moved to the cities. A third of eighth-graders completed the five years at GWCRHS, but they made significant contributions to their communities and the nation.